STOMPIN’ MASTODON COMICS

STOMPIN' MASTODON COMICS

STOMPIN’ MASTODON COMICS is a two-man collective dedicated to producing high concept quality graphic novels with an eye to adapt to the silver screen and other ancillary avenues. This entity consists of David Edwards (comprehensive interiors – pencils, inks & colours – as well as covers, storyboarding and design) and Arno Hurter (writing/concepts, storyboarding and lettering).

We are based in South Africa, but are looking to distribute abroad, most specifically Europe and the States via print and electronic means. Any publishers/investors keen to do business, please contact us at arnohurter@mweb.co.za (Arno) and ed-art@mweb.co.za (Dave) for more information.

Looking for something different? Want to read outside the box? Give us a try and experience our ‘Movies Of The Mind’, coming soon to a cerebellum near you!

STOMPIN’ MASTODON – Adventure Imagined…

 

Stompin Mastodon on MyEBook.com

 

STOMPIN’ MASTODON COMICS

THE STORY SO FAR...

FINAL TAKE

FINAL TAKE

ROXY SPLASH PAGE

ROXY SPLASH PAGE

INTERVIEW – INVESTCOMICS

Interview InvestComics

David Edwards receives international acclaim for his work as an Illustrator and Cartoonist
Bob Heske (a renowned American Independent Publisher) interviewed talented Old Queenian, David Edwards in November 2010.

As  lead-in to the interview, he states ‘David Edwards is one of the most talented artists you probably haven’t heard of … but soon will! Enjoy the interview and a glimpse of Mr Edwards’ work. You will certainly see more, so be sure to grab his books while he is relatively unknown. His anonymity won’t last for long, my friends. Trust me on that’.

1. How does a guy living out in East London, South Africa make a living out of creating comic books?

(DE:)   Well I am still working on that. I work as a freelance illustrator and have my sights set on sequential art which I have been doing in my spare time for the last couple of years. I think my so called “day job” has prepared me quite well for getting back into what was a childhood dream. I used to make my own comic books as a kid and, although I have never stopped drawing, I did get sidetracked by real life and making a living. Thankfully 99% of my career has been doing some form of art or another. So it’s great to get back into this but with a better set of tools this time around.

2. You do a lot of work with writer Arno Hurter who also lives in South Africa. How did you two make a connection, and what have you been working on to date?

(DE:)   We met years ago when he worked at the same company as my wife. We discussed working on something together back then, but never got around to it.

Then a couple of years ago we bumped into each other in a video rental shop. I said I wanted to work on a comic and could he come up with an idea or two. A week later he came back to me with 10 synopses … and they were all brilliant! We picked one to start, ALTERED NATE, and began working on an 11-page opening chapter. Right from the outset we decided to name our collective, and Arno came up with STOMPIN’ MASTODON (the genesis of which is a story of its own).

We have just completed another sci-fi/horror short story called HANDS which is aimed at a more mature audience. Heavy Metal magazine readers will enjoy this one. We may expand on this story at a later date as I think it has great potential as a teen horror movie.

3. Give us the background story about your latest endeavour, THE MUSE.

(DE:)   Gladly. Our next project seemed to select itself when, after a concert in my home town (East London) by Arno Carstens, I got chatting to him and discovered a fellow comic book lover. That’s when Arno Hurter’s story THE MUSE jumped up and took centre stage. It’s a modern take on the FAUST fable (well in the beginning anyway – I know Arno, things will get seriously unhinged).

Arno Carstens – who is concentrating on his solo career at the moment – is an amazing and diverse talent. Worth checking out by comic lovers. If you can get hold of SPRINGBOK NUDE GIRLS CDs, you’ll find songs like Supergirl, Wolfmen, Steel Man Soon, Spaceman, Food for the Demon, among others which I think all invoke comic book imagery. Great to draw to.

Arno Carstens and his wife Melanie are ‘playing’ the main roles in the story which has, at its heart, a love story.

4. Where can we see a preview of this work?

(DE:)   At myebook.com.  We are currently working on chapter two of THE MUSE and will have it posted up, hopefully, early next year.

5. Your website shows that you pretty much do it all – cartoons, caricatures, cover art, sequential art, story boards, and prints. Which do you think is your personal strength, and what is your favourite genre to draw in?

(DE:)   When I studied art everything was done traditionally – i.e., pencils, paint brush and airbrush. Living in a small city, you learn to apply your art skills to whatever may be required.  I think that diversity has enabled me to continue doing a variety of styles depending on what is needed, albeit mostly digitally these days. I think that drawing is my strength as it is the foundation of any style of painting. My favorite genre would be Fantasy/Sci-Fi/Horror. I grew up reading a lot of Stephen King and my earliest inspiration, art-wise, was the late Frank Frazetta. There are many brilliant artists today but one who has stood out for me is Simon Bisley – an incredible talent.

6. Your website also includes a gallery for “chalkboards”. What exactly is a chalkboard for the uninitiated?

(DE:)   I started doing chalkboards in pubs and restaurants which generally are used to advertise the latest specials. It’s usually the first thing patrons look at when they arrive. I started drawing cartoons with the specials. Eventually the local brewery caught on to the idea and before long every pub and restaurant in town and up and down the coast had one. I still do a few chalkboards using real chalk but increasingly do the artwork digitally. From a distance you can’t tell the difference and the digital prints don’t smudge.

7. I know from first-hand experience that you do Speed Art (to see an example, go to here). Mind telling our readers what this is and what software you use to make your art quickly come to life?

(DE:)   As a kid I would watch my father draw and was always amazed at how a picture, starting with a few loose strokes, would materialize into a mini-masterpiece. It just took a while, but in those days, to me, it was better than watching TV. I discovered screen capture software online, starting off with the demo version and was amazed by how simple it was. The sketches I’ve done to date average just over an hour and are then compressed to a couple of minutes with music added. Technically it’s not “speed art’ but speeded-up art. I wish I could draw that fast – I’d get a lot more done. The software I use is BBFlashback.

8. Aside from your website, where else can we see previews of your books or buy them online?

(DE:)   You can see ALTERED NATE and THE ART OF DAVID EDWARDS also on myebook.com. We don’t have anything for sale as yet but hope to finish the first issues of ALTERED NATE and THE MUSE next year and they will then be for sale. A major milestone will be when we get THE MUSE graphic novel completed and on the market.

9. Are you available for hire? If so, what is the best way to contact you to get you to work on a project?

(DE:)   In my capacity as a freelance illustrator I’m happy to take on comic book or album cover art. As far as sequential art goes, Arno has enough stories to keep me going for another three lifetimes (his words).

My e-mail is the best place to contact me: ed-art@mweb.co.za

 

PRESS RELEASE

One & Done

InvestComics One and Done Anthology Announces the Creators to Appear in the Book.
STOMPIN’ MASTODON COMICS duo Arno Hurter and David Edwards have four stories selected for inclusion in InvestComics One and Done Anthology. Watch this space for publishing details…
Check it out

INTERVIEW – THE FORTRESS OF SOLITUDE

Solitude

Exclusive Interview with Comic Book Illustrator David Edwards – ArtCore
Jarrod Saunders November 16, 2011 0

David Edwards received international acclaim for his work as an Illustrator and Cartoonist. His website ArtCore hosts a number of his works. He took some time to give us an exclusive interview.

JS: There aren’t many comic book enthusiasts in South Africa, least not as many as before, even though it’s picking up again. How does an illustrator from small town East London manage to thrive in this art-form?

DE: I think there are more than you might think…plus of course there are the ones who haven’t discovered that they are yet. Your blog, for example, proves there are many enthusiasts out there and I believe we are only scratching the surface. As for creating comics it’s simply a case of following the dream and acting on it. I started making comics as a kid and since recently re-focusing on the comic book side of my art (when I started collaborating with writer Arno Hurter), have been fortunate to have had a few short stories published internationally.

JS: You have a very impressive body of work that includes storyboards, comic books, cartoons and sketches. How did you manage to find yourself doing this as a full time career and where do you draw your inspiration from?

DE: While, I guess, the ideal is to specialise in one field, the reality I found was the need to diversify. I enjoy the variety of what I do. It basically all comes back to one thing and that’s drawing. I have been fortunate to be able to make a career out of something I really love doing.

Music and movies are probably the main sources of my inspiration with a good dose of dreams and reality thrown into the mix. There are also many great artists out there, living and past, who do inspire.

Here is a quote from artist Andrew Loomis in a book about drawing, which struck a chord with me: ’I assume that the desire to express yourself with pen and pencil is not only urgent but almost undeniable, and that you feel you must do something about it. I feel that talent means little unless coupled with an insatiable desire to give an excellent personal demonstration of ability. I feel also that talent must be in company with a capacity for unlimited effort, which provides the power that eventually hurdles the difficulties that would frustrate lukewarm enthusiasm.’

JS: One of your more popular works includes doing a comic book series with Arno Carstens, called the Muse. Tell us more about this project and the mediums you used.

DE: Arno Hurter, my writing partner, had a concept of doing a modern take on the Faust fable. Chatting to Arno Carstens after a gig I found he was yet another comic book enthusiast and the connection seemed obvious. We did an eleven page introduction chapter, before being swallowed up by other projects. I’d like to complete it someday perhaps in a slightly different style. I work almost entirely digitally these days, using a Wacom tablet & stylus working in Painter and Photoshop.

JS: Tell us more about Speed art. What is it and how do you do it?

DE: The ones I’ve done so far are recorded sketches taken to a degree of finish usually about 60 – 90 minutes, which are then sped up to just a couple of minutes. There are various screen capture programs you can use for this. I use Blueberry Flashback. I plan to do more ambitious pieces as well as some tutorials next year.

JS: Does the term “struggling artist” ring true even for a brilliant illustrator as yourself?

DE: I’ve done pretty well considering. It can take a while to make a name for yourself especially in today’s global village. I must admit that I wouldn’t mind finding a patron, even if it’s just for a couple of years, which would allow me to work on projects with huge potential, without having to worry about paying the bills. Join the worldwide revolution – spread the wealth.

JS: Have you considered leaving South Africa to explore the possibilities of doing artwork at a bigger production company like DC Comics or Marvel?

DE: Not seriously. When I was younger I was keen to work for 2000AD. I would prefer to work on original material for an independent publisher. Having said that, I wouldn’t mind doing a short story or two featuring Batman. I’d like to go to one of the big Comic Con’s in the USA in the not too distant future, to check out the lay of the land and do some promoting of our own titles. Ultimately I’d like to start a studio with top talent to produce a variety of titles and link it to a program to develop young aspiring comic book artists.

JS: What has been your favourite piece of artwork to work on so far and what can we expect from Dave Edwards in the future?

DE: Favourite…that’s tricky. Aren’t artworks like children? You love them all equally. In recent memory, I really enjoyed working on the ‘Lomax Alien’ mainly because it started as something entirely different in mind, to what it turned out to be. A bit of playing around I thought turned out quite well. As for the future, of course no one knows but I would like to see the launch of the ROXY comic and watch as it grows into what it can become. We are planning the comic as a super-storyboard for a potential film. It’s got summer blockbuster written all over it. I want to do a couple of graphic novels and perhaps a coffee table book a few years down the line. Did I mention that it all starts with the dream…?

ROXY COMIC POSTER

Roxy Comic Poster

ONE AND DONE

ONE AND DONE

ONE AND DONE now available … and we’re in it!

 

ONE AND DONE, a charitable anthology from InvestComics (www.investcomics.com) is now available for purchase. “ONE AND DONE” is a collection of 1-page graphic tales of various genres (horror, super hero, fantasy, comedy) that have one common connection — they all end in Death! We were happy to include five stories in the book which features nearly 50 one-page fatal tales and a “KILLER EXTRAS” section with addtional pinup art and original content. ONE AND DONE is a mere $6.99 and all proceeds go to support the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund. InvestComics is supporting the book with a series of creator interviews. We were thrilled to be the 1st (we had the most stories in the book!), and you can read our interview and see samples of our submissions here:

http://investcomics.com/features/one-and-done-dual-interview-arno-hurter-and-david-edwards

We would appreciate it if you’d share the link for the book’s online website, write a favorable review or pick up a copy. Here is the link:

http://mirasmartshop.3dcartstores.com/InvestComics-Presents-One-Done_p_322.html

RAMIRO – PRESS RELEASE

RAMIRO - LOGO

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

 

‘RAMIRO’ TO BECOME A REGULAR ON INVESTCOMICS’ WEBSITE

(Rock Vulture speculated to be ‘pleased as road kill’ about said development)

Ramiro, Rock Vulture, a brand new web comic by South African creators David Edwards (art and design) and Arno Hurter (scripts and lettering), has been selected by InvestComics President Jay Katz to be carried on his company’s website within the IC Web Comics Section.

 

“We’re thrilled and flattered,” the South African duo responded. “Ramiro has only been hatched and around for a week and he’s already evoked a massive and overwhelmingly positive response. This bodes well for the future…”

 

The strip’s eponymous character is a rock vulture with attitude, appetite and a real lust for life. He finds himself at the center of a gigantic cast of characters, both animal and human, fauna, insect and flora, and always coming up trumps. Well, mostly.

 

“The strip relies heavily on gallows’s humor,” David states. “With the odd bit of poignancy and an emotional depth seeping through. Our mission statement is: anything goes, as long as it’s interesting or funny. Sometimes hopefully both.”

 

“Ramiro is a classic anti-hero,” Arno adds. “He’s a scavenger, a bald and butt-ugly opportunist of the worst kind, but he’s also soulful, compelling and strangely enough, oddly likeable. People are attracted to characters that are rough around the edges, yet who are also colorful, consistent and true (at least to themselves). Ramiro has all these qualities in spades. He’s a great catalyst for funny observations and situations. It’s like lighting a match near a pocket of methane gas and watching the Fourth of July erupt in a panel near you.”

 

Upon being asked how he felt about recent developments, Ramiro, in between gulping strips of scavenged meat from an unidentifiable carcass and taking a few frenetic stabs at his terrified creators, snarled a surly, “No comment,” after which he tried loosening the brake cable on a nearby stationary car.

 

Please join Ramiro on his regular new InvestComics’ home for belly laughs, drama, escapism and the occasional bit of food for thought.

 

Arno and Dave hope to carry on his carrion adventures for years yet to come.

© 2011 ARTCORE | David Edwards